In July 2013, a production crew from WBT-2 Public Broadcasting in Miami, headed by producer Alexa Elliott, accompanied me, Tom Baumiller (University of Michigan) and Forest Gahn (Brigham Young University-Idaho) to shoot an episode of their long-running series "Changing Seas" on our research into the ecology of deep-water crinoids (sea lilies and feather stars). The episode, "Living Fossils" was first aired in June 2014 and can be viewed at http://video.wpbt2.org/video/2365255097/.

The Great West Indian Sea Lily, Cenocrinus asterius, at a depth of 570 ft.

The Great West Indian Sea Lily, Cenocrinus asterius, at a depth of 570 ft.

A group of barnacle-like crinoids, Holopus rangii, with a juvenile at upper right and several small, dark, button-like Cyathidium pourtalesi, a close relative of Holopus.

A group of barnacle-like crinoids, Holopus rangii, with a juvenile at upper right and several small, dark, button-like Cyathidium pourtalesi, a close relative of Holopus.

Go to https://charles-messing.squarespace.com/roatan-honduras/ for more information about our deep submersible expeditions and research on crinoids and other creatures off Isla Roatán, Honduras.